Screenshot of a  tweet, @SpaceForceCSO Gen. John W. "Jay" Raymond unveiled the Guardian Service Dress prototype a modern, distinctive, professional uniform during the @AirForceAssoc's #ASC21.

In a tweet,  @SpaceForceCSO Gen. John W. "Jay" Raymond unveiled the Guardian Service Dress prototype a modern, distinctive, professional uniform during the @AirForceAssoc's #ASC21.

The prototype for the new uniform for the Space Force's Guardians, as they have been officially designated, is a short navy blue jacket with a large flap over the right breast, secured by a diagonal line of six silver buttons.

General George S. Patton, Jr.'s wearing his self-designed Tanker's uniform. While never adopted, elements, such as the boots, did influence the Army's design.

General George S. Patton, Jr.'s wearing his self-designed Tanker's uniform. While never adopted, elements, such as the boots, did influence the Army's design.

It has a standing collar, and the service badge, with a delta-shaped rocket pushing into a star, is worn below the left breast.

The jacket is matched with grey trousers or skirts.

"Modern, distinctive, professional" the Space Force called it in a tweet.

And yet, those familiar with military history — perhaps not so much with science fiction — will recognize the overwhelming influence of one of the United States' most flamboyant leaders, George S. Patton.

In the early days of the Army’s armor branch of service, Patton sought ways to both give the tankers a unique identity and provide them with an efficient uniform. One of his prototype designs, later called the “Green Hornet” pattern, is echoed in today’s Space Force uniform.

Left: The prototype design of USSF's uniform revealed on Sept. 21, 2021. On the right, a reconstruction of General Patton's design for the new Armored Branch's uniform from the 1930s.

Left: The prototype design of USSF's uniform revealed on Sept. 21, 2021. On the right, a reconstruction of General Patton's design for the new Armored Branch's uniform from the 1930s. 

With similar intent to Patton’s, Chief of Space Operations General Jay Raymond, wrote of the USSF’s new outfit, "Every winning team needs a uniform!”

Coincidence? Both Patton and the USSF desired a distinctive uniform that would impart practicality and unique identity. 

Coincidence? Both Patton and the USSF desired a distinctive uniform that would impart practicality and unique identity. 

Similarities don’t start and end with Patton’s “Green Hornet” uniform, however. Designs with diagonal buttons holding down breast flaps have been seen for centuries in European and American uniforms majors today. Many have pointed out that the Space Force prototypes bear striking similarities to uniforms seen in television’s "Star Trek" and Hollywood’s "Battlestar Galactica.” In fact, even the USSF’s service badge and logo are difficult to distinguish from that of Star Trek’s Starfleet Command.

Regardless of the influence, the new uniform is just a minor stepping stone in the nation’s attempt to “go where no one has gone before.”

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