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Skinner announces second sale of William Rose Colonial and Revolutionary Arms Collection on February 25th

The second part of the William Rose's militaria enthusiast’s extensive and valued collection follows on the heels of an October auction that smashed records.
Skinner-Feb-25-Auction

MARLBOROUGH, MA – Skinner Auctioneers will host a live auction of Arms & Militaria on February 25, 2022 at 10:00 AM in its Marlborough galleries. This extensive array of 17th and 18th Century arms, accoutrements and documents represents an important contribution to the history of warfare and military occupation in colonial North America, including items deployed by American, French and British soldiers, as well as Hessian auxiliaries. This is the second part of a landmark sale, of the private collection of colonial and revolutionary arms enthusiast William Rose, and includes rare and historically significant items indicative of Rose’s comprehensive interest in the period.

James Potter Loyalist Cavalry Saber, New York, 1778-81 James Potter Loyalist Cavalry Saber, New York, 1778-81. Large iron hilt with large slotted counter-guard, tapering knuckle bow connecting to a large olive-shaped pommel, boldly carved wood grip, top of knuckle bow has seven small notches filed into the edge; long curved singleedge blade with false edge at the tip, the left side of the ricasso boldly marked "POTTER." Blade lg. 35 3/8, overall lg. 42 1/2 in. Note: James Potter was a devout Loyalist living in New York City who took an oath of loyalty to the British government in October 1776. By the middle of 1778 it is clear that Potter was gearing up to produced swords as he advertised in the Royal Gazette on June 13 and 17 seeking a "forger" and "two or three filers" to apply for work with James Potter; Sword Cutler in Maden-Lane." His advertisement corresponds with the raising of numerous new Loyalist regiments that were being raised to fight alongside the British as the Revolution moved southward. While firearms were supplied by the British Board of Ordnance, the procurement of swords was left to the units themselves. In America, Colonel Alexander Innes, Inspector General of the Provincial Forces was tasked with procuring the swords for the new Loyalist cavalry units. Innes turned to James Potter to supply the newly needed swords. In all, between January 1779 and December 1781, Potter supplied 1,580 swords to the Loyalist troops through Innes. The swords quickly developed a reputation of sturdiness and lethality wit the troops and were coveted by any American cavalryman who was able to obtain one from a defeated foe.

James Potter Loyalist Cavalry Saber, New York, 1778-81 James Potter Loyalist Cavalry Saber, New York, 1778-81. Large iron hilt with large slotted counter-guard, tapering knuckle bow connecting to a large olive-shaped pommel, boldly carved wood grip, top of knuckle bow has seven small notches filed into the edge; long curved singleedge blade with false edge at the tip, the left side of the ricasso boldly marked "POTTER." Blade lg. 35 3/8, overall lg. 42 1/2 in. Note: James Potter was a devout Loyalist living in New York City who took an oath of loyalty to the British government in October 1776. By the middle of 1778 it is clear that Potter was gearing up to produced swords as he advertised in the Royal Gazette on June 13 and 17 seeking a "forger" and "two or three filers" to apply for work with James Potter; Sword Cutler in Maden-Lane." His advertisement corresponds with the raising of numerous new Loyalist regiments that were being raised to fight alongside the British as the Revolution moved southward. While firearms were supplied by the British Board of Ordnance, the procurement of swords was left to the units themselves. In America, Colonel Alexander Innes, Inspector General of the Provincial Forces was tasked with procuring the swords for the new Loyalist cavalry units. Innes turned to James Potter to supply the newly needed swords. In all, between January 1779 and December 1781, Potter supplied 1,580 swords to the Loyalist troops through Innes. The swords quickly developed a reputation of sturdiness and lethality wit the troops and were coveted by any American cavalryman who was able to obtain one from a defeated foe.

Ranging in date from the mid-17th Century to the end of the Revolutionary War, the wide variety of arms contains rare items of signature quality, including several which have been published as illustrative examples of militaria from the period as a whole. Highlights from the collection’s eclectic range include an American-made cavalry saber by James Potter of New York. Crafted in 1778 for the British forces during their occupation of New York City, the sword, distinctively engraved with Potter’s name, represents an unusual case of American manufacturing for the British occupation and is in exemplary condition.

Rare Richard Wilson New Jersey Contract Musket Rare Richard Wilson New Jersey Contract Musket, mid-18th century, as found, shortened 41 7/16 in., .76 caliber round barrel with ring decoration at breech, the left side of breech with London Company of Gunmaker's proof marks and asterisk over "RW" Richard Wilson barrel maker's mark, traces of "LONDON" engraved on the top of the barrel; double bridled curved lock plate with convex surface and pointed tail, engraved "WILSON" below the pan; walnut stock with slight handrail butt, subtle teardrop at rear of lock mortice and side plate, carved plateau around the breech plug tang, rammer channel stamped between the lower pipe and entry with assembly number "IIII" and "IK"; brass furniture including butt plate with stepped tang engraved "NEW-JERSEY," trigger guard with pointed finial, convex Land Pattern-style side plate with concave inner surface and "IIII" assembly number, and three short sheet brass rammer pipes set up for a wood rammer, the upper pipe is slightly trumpeted and is likely a period replacement, overall lg. 57 1/4 in. Note: Evidence suggests that as early as 1747 the Colony of New Jersey purchased stands of arms from London to provide for the defense of the colony. In that year it is thought that 500 arms were purchased from Richard Wilson.

Rare Richard Wilson New Jersey Contract Musket Rare Richard Wilson New Jersey Contract Musket, mid-18th century, as found, shortened 41 7/16 in., .76 caliber round barrel with ring decoration at breech, the left side of breech with London Company of Gunmaker's proof marks and asterisk over "RW" Richard Wilson barrel maker's mark, traces of "LONDON" engraved on the top of the barrel; double bridled curved lock plate with convex surface and pointed tail, engraved "WILSON" below the pan; walnut stock with slight handrail butt, subtle teardrop at rear of lock mortice and side plate, carved plateau around the breech plug tang, rammer channel stamped between the lower pipe and entry with assembly number "IIII" and "IK"; brass furniture including butt plate with stepped tang engraved "NEW-JERSEY," trigger guard with pointed finial, convex Land Pattern-style side plate with concave inner surface and "IIII" assembly number, and three short sheet brass rammer pipes set up for a wood rammer, the upper pipe is slightly trumpeted and is likely a period replacement, overall lg. 57 1/4 in. Note: Evidence suggests that as early as 1747 the Colony of New Jersey purchased stands of arms from London to provide for the defense of the colony. In that year it is thought that 500 arms were purchased from Richard Wilson.

An exceptional British musket, manufactured in England but engraved with an inscription by the 4th Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, is another example of the fascinating role colonial weaponry played across factions in the Revolutionary War. This essential British sidearm was issued to American loyalists sometime after the reorganization of the 4th Regiment in 1778. Stationed on Staten Island for most of the war, some of the battalion later fought under Benedict Arnold in Connecticut, following his treason. An Irish-made cavalry dragoon pistol offers another unusual example of arms provenance from within the British Empire, as a model nearly identical to the Tower of London dragoon bears the inscription “Trulock 1762,”—indicative of the freedom some gunsmiths had when contracting with British troops staged on the Irish Establishment.

British Colonel Churchill's 10th Dragoons Regiment Pistol, c. 1743- 44 British Colonel Churchill's 10th Dragoons Regiment Pistol, c. 1743- 44, 10 in., .60 caliber barrel with ring decorated breech, engraved on the top "CHURCHILL," Tower ordance proof marks at the top of the breech, stamped "41" on the left side of the breech, the breech plug tang stamped with a crown over crossed scepters mark at the top and a crown at the bottom; curved double bridle lock with double line border engraving, pointed tail engraved "TOWER/1742," engraved below the pain with a crown over "GR" and stamped crown broad arrow mark, the inside of the lock plate maked with a crown over "7" inspector's mark next to another incomplete mark, the tumbler bridle and tail of the lock plate with "VIII" assembly numbers, the side nails with assembly numbers "VI" and "VII"; walnut stock with carved plateau around the breech plug tang, storekeeper's mark stamped to the rear of the lock mortice, the inside of the side plate mortice with assembly number "VII" and the number "4" punched into the surface twice, and the rammer channel marked "ES" between the rammer pipe and stock entry; brass furniture including a butt cap with long ears and grotesque mask retaining stud, thumb piece engraved "T.1/29," trigger guard with acorn finial, convex side plate marked on the inside surface with assembly number "VII," and single cast brass rammer pipe, no rammer, overall lg. 16 1/2 in. Literature: This pistol is illustrated and described in Robert Brooker, British Military Pistols and Associated Edged Weapons (Robert Brooker, 2016), p. 89.

British Colonel Churchill's 10th Dragoons Regiment Pistol, c. 1743- 44 British Colonel Churchill's 10th Dragoons Regiment Pistol, c. 1743- 44, 10 in., .60 caliber barrel with ring decorated breech, engraved on the top "CHURCHILL," Tower ordnance proof marks at the top of the breech, stamped "41" on the left side of the breech, the breech plug tang stamped with a crown over crossed scepters mark at the top and a crown at the bottom; curved double bridle lock with double line border engraving, pointed tail engraved "TOWER/1742," engraved below the pain with a crown over "GR" and stamped crown broad arrow mark, the inside of the lock plate marked with a crown over "7" inspector's mark next to another incomplete mark, the tumbler bridle and tail of the lock plate with "VIII" assembly numbers, the side nails with assembly numbers "VI" and "VII"; walnut stock with carved plateau around the breech plug tang, storekeeper's mark stamped to the rear of the lock mortice, the inside of the side plate mortice with assembly number "VII" and the number "4" punched into the surface twice, and the rammer channel marked "ES" between the rammer pipe and stock entry; brass furniture including a butt cap with long ears and grotesque mask retaining stud, thumb piece engraved "T.1/29," trigger guard with acorn finial, convex side plate marked on the inside surface with assembly number "VII," and single cast brass rammer pipe, no rammer, overall lg. 16 1/2 in. Literature: This pistol is illustrated and described in Robert Brooker, British Military Pistols and Associated Edged Weapons (Robert Brooker, 2016), p. 89.

Mr. Rose’s collection also includes notable accoutrements indicative of his broad study and avid interest in the colonial period. A brass 34-piece shot-mold, made by clockmaker Nathaniel Dominy, speaks to the wide range of industries which were conscripted into war production during a period of limited industrial ability. Pay vouchers, dating from the March on Lexington, 1775, and in exceptional condition given the fragility of foolscap, offer one of the few glimpses still available into the lives of ordinary service members among the lower ranks.

Skinner

About Skinner - Skinner attracts top consignments and commands record-breaking prices in the international auction marketplace. With renowned expertise and extraordinary service, Skinner is the place for buyers, sellers and the passionately curious. Skinner appraisers are familiar faces on PBS’s 19-time Emmy Award-nominated ANTIQUES ROADSHOW. Visit us in Boston, Marlborough, New York, Maine, Florida, or online at https://www.skinnerinc.com

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