Military Vehicle Spotlight: 1973 AM General M151A2

1973 AM General M151A2
Owned by Michael Weaver
Photo by John Adams-Graf

 

M151A2 4×4 1/4-ton Tactical Truck

  • Net Weight: 2,140 lbs.
  • Gross Weight:  3,340 lbs.
  • Maximum Towed Load: 2,000 lbs.
  • Engine: The M151 series used a Ford Motor Co.-designed 4 cylinder motor
  • Displacement: 141.5 cu. in.
  • Fuel: Gasoline
  • Horsepower: 71 @ 3,800 rpm
  • Maximum Speed: 66 mph
  • Maximum Range: 300 miles

Historical Note:

The M151 was a pure Ford design starting in the early 1950s with the T-122 which then became the XM151 before being standardized as the M151. Delivery of the M151 began in 1960 but difficult handling characteristics resulted in new versions introduced in 1963 (M151A1) and again in 1969 (M151A2). This last version incorporated a much safer semi-trailing arm suspension, deep-dish wheels, larger composite-type marker and taillights, electric windshield wipers and a mechanical fuel pump.Initially, Ford produced the M151A2 from 1969-1971. AM General won the contract and took over production in 1972 and continued rolling out M151A2s until 1985.

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2 thoughts on “Military Vehicle Spotlight: 1973 AM General M151A2

  1. jgilmore on said:

    You wrote,

    “….Engine: Willys MD F-Head 4 cylinder……”..????

    Mike, you should always check with two sources for info on vehicles for your blog……DO NOT depend on the ” Standard Catalog of Military Vehicles” printed by KP Publishing……….it has way too many mistakes!! This is where you got the specs on the M151A2 as it states the same error for the motor.

    The M-151 series used a Ford Motor Co. designed 4 cylinder motor and not the Willys MD motor (used in the Willys M38A1). In fact the entire M151 was a pure Ford design starting in the early 1950’s with the T-122 which then became the XM151 and then the M151.

    Jim Gilmore
    Jim Thorpe, PA.

    • John Adams-Graf on said:

      JAG has to take the fall on this one. That is EXACTLY what I did–cut and pasted from the Standard Catalog. The author, David Doyle, and I have been marking up our copies for many years to correct the info. This one slipped past me and I never considered it odd, though I should have!

      Thank you, again, Jim, for taking the time to read these over and make corrections. I am correcting my master document immediately!
      —JAG

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