MV Spotlight: G-843 ‘Mighty Mite’

by David Doyle

amc-president-george-romney-on-a-1959-usmc-m-422

The initial production Mighty Mite, the M422, was noted for its short length, tight turning radius, and minimal weight. It had an aluminum body and every component was designed with optimal weight savings in mind. Here, AMC President George Romney sits in a 1959 USMC M422.

The Mighty Mite was developed by Kansas City-based inventor Ben Gregory in 1946-47. Gregory soon formed Mid-America Research Corporation, or MARCO, and enlisted the help Harold Crist, Ralph Turner, Frank McMillan, and Chet Hemphling. These four men had been instrumental in the creation of the jeep for American Bantam prior to WWII. Despite having designed and patented the driveline and suspension of the Mighty Mite, Gregory was eventually force out of the company.

An imported Porsche engine powered the Mighty Mite prototypes. At the time, US military regulation precluded the use of a Porsche engine, or any other imported components. The search for a suitable American built power plant lead to American Motors, which perfected and produced the Mighty Mite (before it owned Jeep) from December 1959 through December 1962. With an aluminum body, and an aluminum air-cooled 108-cid V-4 engine, the Mighty Mite weighed just less than 1 ton.

The most apparent difference between the the M422 and the M422A1 models was the six inches additional body length between the front seat and the rear wheel well found on the latter. The additional reinforcing embossment in this area which is clearly visible on Darryl Bensinger’s M422A1, aids in distinguishing the vehicle.

The most apparent difference between the the M422 and the M422A1 models was the six inches additional body length between the front seat and the rear wheel well found on the latter. The additional reinforcing embossment in this area which is clearly visible on Darryl Bensinger’s M422A1, aids in distinguishing the vehicle.

The vehicles themselves soon attracted the attention of the US Marine Corps. Small, lightweight, low profile, highly maneuverable and with superior off-road performance, the Might Mite was just the type of vehicle the Corps needed.

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Two productions versions of the Mighty Mite were built: The M422 and M422A1. Additionally, there were ten M422E1 trial vehicles. The M422E1 vehicles were created by American Motors by cutting ten M422 vehicles and lengthening the body and chassis by six inches.

Tom Price’s 1960 M422 has been outfitted with the exhaust extension and snorkle for deep-water fording operations.

Tom Price’s 1960 M422 has been outfitted with the exhaust extension and snorkle for deep-water fording operations.

Only 1,250 of the original M422 vehicles were produced, while 2,672 of the later M422A1 were manufactured. The most apparent difference between the two models was the six inches additional body length between the front seat and the rear wheel well. There is an additional reinforcing embossment in this area, which aids in distinguishing the two models. The result is that the M422 has a 65-inch wheelbase, and the M422A1 has a 71-inch wheelbase.

The 107.8 cu. in. AV-108-4 engine creates 55 horsepower at a (governed) 3,600 rpm. John Adams-Graf photo

The 107.8 cu. in. AV-108-4 engine creates 55 horsepower at a (governed) 3,600 rpm. John Adams-Graf photo

Both the M422 and M422A1 models left the factory with a unique, and now hard-to-find, thin windshield. Many of these windshields were later replaced, per a Modification Work Order (MWO) with a thicker windshield, which closely resembles a M38A1 windshield, differing in the locations of the windshield wipers and hood rests. These windshields were produced specifically for inclusion in these modification kits.

The first trailer issued for use with the Mite was designated the M416. It had a two-position socket for the lunette eye: One for the M151 and the other for the Mite. The M416B1 had brackets to hold water cans on each side of the trailer as seen on this example owned by Tom Price. John Adams-Graf photo

The first trailer issued for use with the Mite was designated the M416. It had a two-position socket for the lunette eye: One for the M151 and the other for the Mite. The M416B1 had brackets to hold water cans on each side of the trailer as seen on this example owned by Tom Price. John Adams-Graf photo

The four-speed transmission was combined with a two-speed transfer case to shorten the driveline. All Mighty Mites had limited-slip differentials front and rear which, together with their short turning radius and light weight, gave them superb off-road performance.

The Spartan instrument panel of the Mighty-Mite featured a fuel gauge, speedometer, ammeter, and oil and engine overheating warning lights in the center of the dash. John Adams-Graf photo

The Spartan instrument panel of the Mighty Mite featured a fuel gauge, speedometer, ammeter, and oil and engine overheating warning lights in the center of the dash. John Adams-Graf photo

The M422 had rear seats in the tailgate that folded down. The M422A1 had them on the rear fender tops as seen here. John Adams-Graf photo

The M422 had rear seats in the tailgate that folded down. The M422A1 had them on the rear fender tops as seen here. John Adams-Graf photo

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