Buyer’s Guide: The HMMWV

What to know before you buy

M998 HMMWV 5/4-ton Truck

The affluent soccer mom’s boulevard cruiser or the Army’s standard light tactical vehicle, the HMMWV was born out of a 1979 desire to consolidate many vehicles into one. Teledyne, Chrysler Defense and AM General submitted prototypes of the new vehicle, which was to replace a menagerie: the M274 Mule, M151 MUTT and the M561 Gama Goat.

The Army dubbed this new vehicle family the High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle, HMMWV. The soldiers called it the HUMVEE.  After extensive competition, AM General was awarded the contract to build the vehicle in March of 1983.

The base vehicle of the HMMWV series was the M998. This vehicle could be configured as either two- or four-door, using removable panels. While most vehicles were supplied with a vinyl top and doors, they could also be equipped with a removable fiberglass top. The cargo area vinyl tops were supplied in a variety of styles, typically a low top that connected to the cab top and is the same height as the cab top. Also available was a high cargo cover.

When configured as a pickup, the backs of the rear seats, which are metal, are repositioned into a horizontal configuration and aluminum panels close the lower portion of the rear door openings. When configured in this manner, the “C” pillar is not raised and the rear cab panel is attached to “B” pillar. In this way, traditional troop seats can be installed in the rear of the HMMWV. The high cargo cover is used with vehicles configured to protect cargo and personnel from inclement weather. No spare tire is carried because the vehicles are equipped with run-flat tires and rims. Photos exist of vehicles with spare tires, but these were not produced for the U.S. government.

Weight: 7,770 pounds
Size (LxWxH): 204.5” x 86” x 102”
Max Speed: 70 mph

Condition code    –   Value (dollars) 
           6………………………. 6,500    
           5
………………………. 9,500   
           4
………………………22,000   
           3
………………………38,000    
           2
………………………45,000  
           1
………………………55,000 

Scarcity – 2


M1025 HMMWV

The M998A2 series, introduced in 1994, had numerous improvements in the power train. The engine was now the 6.5-liter (400 cubic-inch) diesel, and the automatic transmission was now a four-speed unit rather than the three-speed previously used.

The M1025 is an armament carrier without winch; the same vehicle with the winch installed is known as the M1026. This mount allows the HMMWV to be armed with a variety of weapons including the M60, 7.62mm machine gun, M2 .50-caliber machine gun or the MK 19 Grenade Launcher. The ring mount allows weapons traversal of a full 360 degrees.

Weight:    6,780 pounds
Size (LxWxH):    204.5” x 86” x 76”
Max Speed:    70 mph
   
Condition code  -  Scarcity Value (dollars)
            6………………………6,500
            5………………………9,500  
            4…………………….22,000   
            3…………………….40,000    
            2…………………….48,000   
            1…………………….60,000  
   
Scarcity    4

Military Vehicles Magazine uses a given a value  based on a 1-to-6 condition grading scale as follows:

1=Excellent: Restored to maximum professional standards, or a near-perfect original.

2=Fine: Well-restored, or a combination of superior restoration and excellent original parts.

3=Very Good: Complete and operable original or older restoration, or a very good amateur restoration with all presentable and serviceable parts inside and out.

4=Good: Functional or needing only minor work to be functional. Also, a deteriorated restoration or poor amateur restoration.

5=Restorable: Needs complete restoration of body, chassis, and interior. May or may not be running, but is not wrecked, weathered or stripped to the point of being useful only for parts.

6=Parts Vehicle: Deteriorated beyond the point of restoration.

YOU MAY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN:
*Military Vehicles Magazine
*Standard Catalog of U.S. Military Vehicles, 1942-2003

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