Rare air rifles, sniper rifle and snake pistols top Kramer’s Winter Auction

Buyers from across the Midwest filled the Kramer Auction Gallery in Prairie du Chien, Wis., on Jan. 24 for their 2015 Winter Firearms auction. A great cross section of firearms, specifically air rifles to antique arms, brought them out en masse that day.

 

WWIIUS Sniper

The highest-grossing sale of the day was a fine original US WWII 03-A4 sniper rifle with original M73B1 rifle scope. This rifle made another trip “across the pond” after selling to a phone bidder from England for $3,650, (Not sure how much that is in pounds!)

 

NickelPython[2]

Next in line that day was a 6“ nickel-plated Python revolver, this gun was lightly used but with original box. This gun took a long trip as well selling to an Internet buyer from Alaska after demanding $2,990.

 

BluedPython

A 6“ Blued Python showed some honest use but still sold strong at $1,650.

 

NewtonArmsRifle

A rare original Newton Rifle mfg. in Buffalo, N.Y., was a popular item as well. In fine original condition, sporting a rare Bolt peep sight & chambered in the flagship 256 Newton caliber. It traded just shy of $3,000 at 2,990.

 

SheridanModelASuper SheridanModelBSuper

The big surprise of the day was a collection of early Sheridan Air rifles. These guns manufactured in Racine Wisconsin set the standard for American air rifles in the late 1940’s The battle for the very early (serial number 36) Sheridan Model A Super was fiercely contested as Phone, Internet & In-house Bidders slugged it out. When the dust settled this desirable air rifle traded for $2,750. Another later model A Super brought $1,290 & a fine Model B Sheridan was also stronger than expected at $1,650.

 

S&W3 American

The two highest earning Western arms started off with a Smith & Wesson #3 American revolver in 44 cal, this big American top break revolver shot to $2,640, next was a fine Marlin Ballard single shot rifle in 38-50 cal w/ target style sights. This gun showed lots of original finish & traded for $1,980. A Colt Lightning Medium frame pump rifle in 44-40 sold for a final price of $1,870 and a Winchester Model 64 in 30-30 was strong at $1,325. Another interesting Western gun was a rough, but original Springfield 1881 Forager shotgun. These scarce guns were used by troops of the Indian war era to “forage” for additional small game to supplement their regular army rations. Springfield armory manufactured around 1,000 of these guns & due to the nature of their work; surviving examples typically show that they were used hard & put away wet! This gun certainly fit that descriptions & still demanded $925

 

ColtShoulderStock

A few other noteworthy items included a Colt marked shoulder stock for a 1911 style 45 pistol. This possible proto-type stock was in big demand with internet bidders selling just shy of $2,000 for $1,955. A documented Walter PPK in 22 cal which was previously owned by a US ambassador “Jack Olson” was interesting to numerous buyers & ultimately settled at $1,815. A beautiful pair of Mike Borret flying teal decoys soared to $800.

 

1903MARKI

Military Highlights included US 1903 Springfield Mark I rifle selling at $1,150, a Canadian Inglis High power Chinese contract pistol with shoulder stock shipped out to a new buyer for $1,495. A scare WWI era 1908 Schwarlose Squeeze cocker pistol surprised a few folks when it finally sold for $890. Full auction results can be viewed in the archive section of Kramer’s Proxi-Bid page at (www. proxibid.com/kramer) .

 

Kramer’s Spring Firearms auction is set for Sat. March 28th & will feature a collection of 1911 style 45 pistols, Nazi Occupation pistols, Big game & Safari caliber rifles by Weatherby, SAKO, Ruger, Winchester & Remington. Colt Pythons in 4-6-8 “ Barrel lengths, a rare Colt BOA revolver; Smith & Wesson & Ruger pistols, New GLOCK, HK & SIG SAUERS pistols,  plus Ammo, early collectible Traps, sporting goods – military & great related items. More info at www.kramersales.com or call them at (608) 326-8108 for more information.

 

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